Browsing Tag

strategy

Blog, Marketing

Content Marketing Case Study: Inverted Gear Tells a Personal Story about Cancer

September 11, 2017 • By

Despite its prevalence, the power and purpose of content marketing still perplex many business owners. They equate content marketing with blogging, and they just can’t see how blogging could help any business grow, let alone theirs.

Content marketing is far broader than blogging—though blogging is sometimes included—and the goal is to build and strengthen relationships between your brand and your target audience. The best way to do that will vary dramatically from brand to brand and audience to audience, but the core of content marketing comes down to leading and participating in conversations that are emotionally important to your audience.

Blog, Marketing

The Power of “Cost Per Acquisition”

August 16, 2017 • By

A range of metrics can impact your marketing strategy and how you run your business (and we have done a few blog posts on this topic), but few metrics are underestimated and underutilized as much as cost per acquisition.

Cost per acquisition (CPA) is how much your business spends, on average, to acquire a customer. When you define this metric, you can use it to optimize multiple facets of your business. If you run your business without knowing your CPA, you might be missing significant revenue and growth opportunities.

Before we get there, let’s talk about how to calculate CPA.

Blog, Podcast

The Full Customer Journey – Marketing with Marshal and Meesha

August 11, 2017 • By

Taking a brand new prospect from awareness all the way through loyal customer requires multiple touch points and the culmination of many different tactics. Too often, however, we see businesses fixate on just one point of their sales funnel, which means they miss out on opportunities to increase their ROI by ignoring other important parts of the customer journey.

In this episode, we reboot the podcast with some observations about our recent work and talk through the value of looking at the big picture of your business and challenging yourself—and your team—to lean into discomfort in order to uncover greater revenue opportunities.

About the Hosts:
Marshal Carper is a content marketer and founder of Carper Communications. Learn more about him and his work at carpercommunications.com.
Meesha Gerhart is a designer and founder of RedTree Web Design. Learn more about her and her work at redtreewebdesign.com.

Song rights:
“Final Battle of the Dark Wizards” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
2 Men Blues by Stefan Kartenberg (c) 2015 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. dig.ccmixter.org/files/JeffSpeed68/51636 Ft: Admiral Bob

Photo by Yohanes Sanjaya, used under creative commons license. Photo adapted. Original photo available here: https://flic.kr/p/ndeGwj

Blog, Marketing

How do you judge the ROI of your marketing tactics?

July 17, 2017 • By

We recently asked our social media followers if they had any questions about marketing or business growth, and we got multiple questions revolving around the same core subject:

How do I know which parts of my marketing are really working for my business?

This question can seem simple, but the implications are far-reaching. When we work to tie specific results to individual marketing channels, we are actually answering multiple questions at once, and all of them are useful and important. When you look at your marketing, you ultimately want to know:

Blog, Marketing

Goal-Tracking is Vital for Your Ad Budget

June 19, 2017 • By

Over the last few years especially, I’ve had a specific kind of conversation with multiple business owners. They were running expensive display advertising campaigns (think banner ads) that netted them hundreds of thousands of impressions a month accompanied by at least a few hundred clicks.

On the calls with these vendors, the ad managers would walk through a simple report, praising how much traffic the campaign generated and how far above the average industry standard metrics their campaigns were.

The problem was the business owners either weren’t seeing an increase in new business from their website or they weren’t sure how to attribute the business they were getting. Was it from the website or from one of their other marketing efforts?